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Auditions

AUDITIONS FOR THE 2018 SEASON ARE NO LONGER AVAILABLE.

The Tasmanian Theatre Company will hold auditions for the 2019 season late in 2018.  Keep an eye on the website.


Play 1: THESE AUDITIONS ARE NOW CLOSED

UPRISING consists of two plays by award winning playwrights Patricia Cornelius and Melissa Reeves. This is a co-production between TTC and UpStart Theatre, in association with Youth ARC.

Artists working on the project include: Christine Best, Angela Barnard, Katie Robertson, Max Ford and Heath Brown.

Up to 20 roles are available for emerging performers between 18 and 25 years old male and female. 

Successful auditionees will have the opportunity to work in a professional environment with a team of very experienced theatre workers. 

ALSO

Positions of Assistant Director, Assistant Choreographer, Assistant Lighting Designer and Assistant Stage manager may be made available.  These are not paid positions.  They will be made available to emerging artists who want to learn or improve these skills. If you are interested in a being considered for this position, please email Charles Parkinson on charles@tastheatre.com with your CV (no more than 2 pages).

UPRISING will rehearse part time from June 17, 2018.  Performance season runs September 19 – 29.

Rehearsals are likely to be daytime on Sundays and Thursday evenings.  In production week Saturday September 9 – 18th, additional rehearsals will be scheduled.

Do not audition unless you can make a complete commitment to this project. This is a great opportunity for young performers with a desire to learn and for those with professional ambitions. The rehearsal and season will be run as any other professional production would run, so don’t audition unless you are prepared to treat this as you would if it was a job.

 

WHAT TO PREPARE

Please prepare two speeches:

One of your choice - not more than 2 minutes - from an Australian play (not a TV show, a film or a song), and, one of the speeches below.

Speeches need to be learned, not read. 

Wear comfortable clothes and don’t be afraid of being nervous – everyone is.

WHERE?

MAP: Terrapin Puppet Theatre’s loft space, Level 3, Salamanca Arts Centre. Go to the top of the main stairs and turn left – look for audition notices.

WHEN?

If you are given an audition then you will be allocated a time on Saturday May 5th for 20 minutes.  A limited number of people will be shortlisted and will receive an email on the night of Saturday May 5th asking them to attend in the afternoon of Sunday May 6th for a group workshop/audition, so you must keep the afternoon of Sunday May 6th free. 

The cast will be chosen from that group.

WHO WILL BE AT THE AUDITION?

The Director, Christine Best, the TTC Artistic Director and at least one other member of the professional creative team.

WILL I BE PAID?

Each member of the cast and assistant creatives will be paid a small honorarium to help cover costs and everyone will finish the project with a legitimate Tasmanian Theatre Company credit on their CV.

 

AUDITION MONOLOGUES FOR UPRISING

 

Young Woman: The first soldiers reach the Town Hall, and Nadine, Nadine Jensen, the typist from Campbeltown, takes stuff from her big bag. She pours a mixture of red paint, kerosene and turpentine over herself. She runs, Nadine does, headlong into the marching troops. She smears paint over the Commander, Lieutenant Colonel A.V. Preece, and the next few soldiers in the ranks. She stands, red paint streaming down her body, her arms raised in the air while the remaining ranks march carefully around her.

She’s arrested and pleads guilty to ‘offensive behaviour’ the next day in court. She says that she’s not a member of any organisation. She merely wanted to show her opposition to the war. The magistrate fined her $6 and placed her on a good behaviour bond. He suggested she should be remanded for psychiatric examination. Nadine tells him she’s already been examined by two psychiatrists and found to be ‘normal’. Nadine Jensen leaves the courtroom and disappears. Never to be heard of again.

 

Young Woman: At the game, we’re so close, Nan and I, we can almost touch them. The boys are doing fine. They’re like gods and so quickly goes the time. We roar, we call, we scream, we shout, we sing out. We’re up on our feet, we’re telling them to keep it up, to take the mark, to kick the bloody thing, to bring it in. We love them. But something’s holding them back. Or someone. I didn’t think of him as black. I didn’t think of him like that. I suppose I knew, I guess I did, I thought he was my enemy. He was making my team look small. He was taking something from me. He’d rise up, again and again he’d rise up and steal the ball and kick it through to goal. My team was scrambling, they were falling at his feet, useless, unable to compete. He was enormous, unbeatable, a terrifying thing, kind of magnificent as he scored the final goal.

And out it came. Ape!

 

Young Man: I saw him. Entertaining his mates. A girl was at the bar wanting to buy a drink. She’s waiting, just waiting to be served. She’s got no idea that he’s making gestures, crude, behind her, like he wants to fuck her from behind. I’ve seen guys do shit like that before plenty of times. Dumb. But this time, I felt myself rise up. I thought, no way, chum, you’re fucking gone. You don’t do that to a woman behind her back. I got all righteous. I got all high and mighty. I thought you’re nothing but scum, and I went in there and I hit him and he fell back and he didn’t get up.

For some time, though I tried to disguise it, I felt proud. I felt a bit of a hero. I’d stepped up. I’d acted, felt passionate. Something had been asked of me, and I’d responded.

I’d risen to the occasion.

 

Young Man: Yes chef!(quietly) Fuck you, chef.

There is something about you, there is, I don’t know what it is. There’s something and it’s like it’s got a little hand and it puts it up and yells out, me, me, give it to me, I’m asking for it. Do it. Give it to me, would you, please. Go on, please, do it, give it to me.

I don’t mean to hurt your feelings, I really don’t. If I could help you, I would. I’ve helped plenty. I’ve stuck my head out. I’ve taken a bullet, for sure, no problem. I’ve taken the fall. But with you, I don’t know, there’s no point. Is there? You know what I’m talking about. I mean, there’s just this something about you.

Sam cries.

 Oh shit, don’t do that. Don’t do it. That’s exactly what I mean. You crying. Fucking hell, you crying is that, that little hand sticking up, saying do it, kick me, hit me, shit on me.

 

If you want to request an audition, complete the form below and send a recent photo and CV (no more than 2 pages) to rsvp@tastheatre.com with 2018 UPRISING AUDITIONS and your name in the subject line.  Make sure your CV includes your current email address and phone number.


Play 2:   THESE AUDITIONS ARE NOW CLOSED

Blue Cow Theatre and the Tasmanian Theatre Company will be holding auditions on the 17th and 18th April, 2018. Four roles are available for The Campaign, a new verbatim play by Campion Decent, directed by Matt Scholten.

Please note: If you have auditioned for TTC or Blue Cow in the last 12 months you do not need to audition.

Details of the play can be found below.

There will be a creative development from June 12th to June 15th in Hobart. Rehearsals will run full time from September 24th to October 20th. The season will run October 22 to November 3 in the Peacock Theatre.

Actors will be paid award rates for 6 weeks and 4 days.

WHAT TO PREPARE

Please prepare two speeches:

One speech of not more than 3 minutes from an Australian play written post 1990, and, one speech from those below.

Speeches need to be learned, not read.

Wear comfortable clothes and don’t be afraid of being nervous – everyone is.

WHERE?

MAP: Terrapin Puppet Theatre’s loft space, Level 3, Salamanca Arts Centre. Go to the top of the main stairs and turn left – look for audition notices.

WHO?

We usually only audition actors who are trained or have had professional experience.  If you have had some experience and are prepared to work hard and are open to learning and improving your craft as an actor then we would be happy to offer you an audition.

Actors who identify as LGBTQI are strongly encouraged to audition.

 

THE CAMPAIGN - Background to the play

By Campion Decent

“I was arrested for being gay before I’d even danced with another man.” – Rodney Croome

In 1988 more than one hundred arrests were made at Hobart’s popular Salamanca Market when the Tasmanian Gay Law Reform Group defied a ban on a stall that featured petitions to decriminalise sexual activity between consenting adult males in private. The arrests lit the spark for a campaign to change a law in Tasmania that was the most draconian in the Western world in terms of its penalty and, by the time of its repeal, the last of its kind in Australia.

From candid interviews with the people who were there, Campion Decent has fashioned a gripping account of Tasmania’s decades-long gay law reform campaign; the venomous parliamentary debates and public meetings, the individual acts of bravery and humour amidst the hurt, and the dogged march to a landmark United Nations ruling that had far-reaching repercussions in the Federal and Tasmanian Parliaments and the High Court of Australia.

The Campaign chronicles Tasmania’s journey from exclusion to inclusion, from opposition to acceptance, and from hatred to embrace.

For the first time The Tasmanian Theatre Company and Blue Cow Theatre combine to tell this important Tasmanian story partnering with If Theatre & Salamanca Arts Centre. 

 

AUDITION MONOLOGUES FOR THE CAMPAIGN

 

ACTOR 1 (MALE/20s)

Rodney talks about the first time he was arrested at the Salamanca Market …

Rodney: They took us to Liverpool Street police station. People who were considered ringleaders were locked in police cells with no idea how long we’d be there. And there were people calling out from the police van to the people in the cells. But after a while people – intimidated I guess by the situation – fell silent. And that’s when it really started to play on my mind because, like I said, I was a middle-class boy from the North West Coast. I’d never been arrested, never thought I’d be arrested. The intent is to make you sit there in silence and doubt what you do. And it worked for me.

And what turned things around was my knowledge that one of my convict ancestors had been kept in exactly the same place. And on one occasion he was put on the treadwheel, which was exactly where the police cells are now. The treadwheel where convicts in chains would walk in unison. Very dangerous. If someone slipped they could be crushed. They put him on a machine to try and break him. But it didn’t work. We have a photo of him when he was 98. And he looks strong and he looks cheerful. He is completely unbroken by his experiences. And I thought, well, if he can defy the police state that Tasmania was, particularly in convict times, then I can too. They did the worst to him, they put him on a treadwheel, they put him in isolation cells. He didn’t give up. He survived. And he thrived. That was a really important moment for me.

I went on to be arrested again three times. And I never had those doubts again. Ever.

 

ACTOR 2 (MALE/20s or 30s)

Nick talks about the anti-gay rally held at Ulverstone …

Nick: And this guy got up in the middle of this auditorium and just made this really powerful statement about being twenty years old, gay, and proud of who he was. It was one of the bravest things I’ve ever seen. And on the bus home – you know, at one in the morning or something, I was holding hands with him all the way back. It was not a romantic thing; it was just a … supportive thing, a solidarity thing. [He gets a bit teary.] Sorry, I didn’t expect this. [Long pause.] Yeah, the feeling in the bus on the way back was – it was like we’d climbed Mt Everest. You know, on one level, there was like a high. On another level, it was like, how the hell are we going to turn this around?

 

ACTOR 3 (FEMALE/30s)

Lee-Gwen talks about her arrest at Salamanca Market…

Lee-Gwen: I’m nine months pregnant, pretty much exactly. And the next week – the first week of the arrests – I have given birth on the Friday. So I dropped out for a while because of my new baby. Jessie. Well, weeks later, I decide, ‘Right, to heck with this, this is history, it’s still happening, we are two months in, this is still going on, people are still being arrested, I have to be involved, I can’t not be involved.’

So I packed myself up with this absurdly vast nappy bag. You know those stripy non-woven plasticy bags you see in discount stores? Huge things. They don’t really last very well but they’re very good for carting ridiculous quantities of things, like, oh I don’t know, clothes, nappies, a mattress, yes, I actually had a baby mattress folded in this bag. It was very much, ‘I’m probably going to be arrested, I will need supplies’ kind of thinking.

I got there, baby on my front, huge nappy bag in hand, and the police were, ‘Umm, don’t know what we’re supposed to do with you; you’ve got a baby. Umm, we can’t arrest you, what the hell are we going to do?’ They kept asking me things like, ‘Do you want to be in that paddy wagon with all those people?’ ‘Yes, yes I do. The nicest people I know are in that paddy wagon. I would like you to arrest me. Here, arrest me!’ And they just wouldn’t. And I had people in the crowd – because a huge crowd had gathered to watch the spectacle of the arrests – saying I couldn’t possibly be a lesbian because I seemed too normal and too nice. And I had a baby. Which did confuse people. It has to be said, in the ’80s that confused people.

 

ACTOR 4 (FEMALE/50s)

Rodney’s mother talks about the anti-gay public meetings …

Beverley: Rodney’s mum again. [A beat.] One night I drove over to a meeting somewhere where he was talking to church people. And there were two security people there, who they’d got in. Policemen. And this man was saying the usual horrible rhetoric – you know how they do. And I said to him, ‘How dare you say that!’ All eyes shot up to me. And of course Rodney and his lot looked at me. And the policemen come running. And I said, ‘Are you saying these people come from outer space?’ I said, ‘They’re our sons’ – it makes me cry thinking about it – ‘Our sons and daughters, grandsons and granddaughters, nieces and nephews and cousins.’ I said, ‘They belong to people.’

 

If you want to request an audition, complete the form below and email a recent photo and CV (no more than 2 pages) to rsvp@tastheatre.com with 2018 CAMPAIGN AUDITIONS and your name in the subject line.  Make sure your CV includes your current email address and phone number.


 

the form is really LONG, sorry.

Audition Application form

Contact Details
Name *
Name
Stage Name (if different)
Stage Name (if different)
Postal Address *
Postal Address
Do you have an agent? *
About You
(eg. slight, medium, heavy)
Any specific physical characteristics / features? *
Auditions: UPRISING
Auditions for UPRISING will last 20 mins and are available Saturday May 5th from 10.00 am to 5.00 pm. (Further audition slots will be arranged if there is demand.) A limited number of people will be shortlisted and will receive an email on the night of Saturday May 5th asking them to attend in the afternoon of Sunday May 6th for a group workshop/audition. The cast will be chosen from that group. So you MUST keep the afternoon of Sunday May 6th free. We will try to accommodate your preference. If you really can not attend any of these times, please email Charles Parkinson charles@tastheatre.com to discuss.
UPRISING - Audition slots
Please indicate your availability for the following audition time slots.
Auditions: The Campaign
Auditions for The Campaign will last 20 minutes and are available on Tuesday April 17th from 3.00 pm to 7.00 pm and on Wednesday April 18th from 10.00 am to 5.00 pm. We will try to accommodate your preference. If you really can not attend any of these times, please email Charles Parkinson charles@tastheatre.com to discuss.
The Campaign - Audition slots
Please indicate your availability for the following audition time slots.
What is your involvement in the LGBTQI community, if any?
Final Questions
just a few more, honest!
If you are cast, would you have restricted availability for the specified rehearsals or performance? *
Do you have any particular skills that you want us to know about (eg musical instruments, physical skills, accents, foreign languages, choreographic skills, etc)
Do you have any pre-existing medical condition(s) which might affect you in rehearsal or performance? *
Are you a member of the Theatre Council of Tasmania? *